Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Physical activity in the mental health context: Addressing physical activity with clients
by Phillips, Daniel J., Ph.D., Northern Arizona University, 2016, 117; 10189737
Abstract (Summary)

Research over many decades has considered how physical activity affects mental health and how physical activity is perceived and utilized by mental health professionals in the treatment of clients. Findings suggest that physical activity is useful for decreasing symptoms of some disorders, improving mood, and improving cognitive functioning. Further, mental health professionals generally endorse the topic of physical activity as relevant and useful in the mental health context. However, mental health professionals do not generally address client physical activity. Among other concerns, mental health professionals believe that addressing physical activity with clients could have a negative impact on the client’s perception of the counseling process. This study investigated whether addressing client physical activity with college students participating in an intake counseling session influenced client ratings of the session or client ratings of the counseling relationship. There were no significant differences found in client ratings of the counseling session or counseling relationship when physical activity was addressed. The results of this study can be used in making decisions about addressing the topic of physical activity in the mental health context.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Moan, Eugene
Commitee: Gavin, Megan, Margeson, Christopher J., Thomason, Timothy C.
School: Northern Arizona University
Department: Education Specialties
School Location: United States -- Arizona
Source: DAI-B 78/08(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Mental health, Counseling Psychology
Keywords: Counseling, Exercise, Physical activity, Session rating, Therapeutic relationship
Publication Number: 10189737
ISBN: 9781369498561