Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Dyadic analysis of partner adjustment in bipolar couple relationships
by Bordieri, Regina, Psy.D., Alliant International University, 2016, 139; 10252408
Abstract (Summary)

Bipolar disorder is a serious and chronic mental illness associated with deficits in interpersonal functioning that affect both diagnosed individuals and their romantic partners. Despite evidence of a reciprocal relationship between bipolar symptoms and relationship quality, couples therapy is often overlooked as a viable treatment component. This study is the first to examine the relationship between attachment security and dyadic adjustment in bipolar couple relationships (BCRs). A sample of 57 BCRs living together for at least 1 year was recruited. Each couple consisted of one partner diagnosed with bipolar disorder and one non-diagnosed partner. Both partners participated separately and partner responses were matched for dyadic analysis. Actor and partner effects were estimated by fitting a SEM predictive model to the data. Both attachment security and diagnosed partners’ symptoms of depression were found to be significant predictors of the variance in diagnosed and non-diagnosed partners’ dyadic adjustment. Results suggest that BCR treatment should include interventions to increase attachment behaviors associated with emotional availability, responsiveness, and engagement in addition to reducing bipolar symptoms of depression.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Witting, Alyssa Banford
Commitee: Negash, Sesen, Woolley, Scott R.
School: Alliant International University
Department: Psychology
School Location: United States -- California
Source: DAI-B 78/06(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Mental health, Psychology, Clinical psychology
Keywords: Atachment behaviors, Attachment, Bipolar disorder, Couple relationships, Couple's therapy, Dyadic adjustment
Publication Number: 10252408
ISBN: 9781369449273
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