Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Financialization and the New Organizational Inequality in U.S. Higher Education
by Eaton, Charles Stephens, Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley, 2016, 127; 10192609
Abstract (Summary)

This dissertation advances scholarship on how financialization – the increasing power of financial ideologies and markets – has transformed diverse organizations, including non-profits, state institutions, and households. In three papers, I explain how financialization has contributed to rising organizational inequality in U.S. undergraduate education education since the 1990s: 1) “The Financialization of U.S. Higher Education” develops new quantitative measures to find large but skewed relative increases in the financial costs and returns from endowments, colleges’ institutional borrowing, equity offerings by for-profit colleges, and student loan borrowing, 2) “The Transformation of U.S. For-Profit Colleges,” uses a unique college-level and multi-wave longitudinal dataset to show how the spread of shareholder value ideology led to a new industrial-scale business model with negative consequences for student outcomes, and 3) “The Ivory Tower Tax Haven” explains how long-standing tax exemptions have supported new endowment investment strategies that have fueled rising expenditures to maximize the prestige of the wealthiest universities. Altogether, I highlight the importance of finance ideologies in the shifting balance of resources between and within the many heterogeneous types of U.S. colleges.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Weir, Margaret, Fligstein, Neil
Commitee: Brady, Henry, Fourcade, Marion
School: University of California, Berkeley
Department: Sociology
School Location: United States -- California
Source: DAI-A 78/06(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Education finance, Sociology, Higher education
Keywords: Economic sociology, Financialization, Income inequality, Stratification
Publication Number: 10192609
ISBN: 9781369559064
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