Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Decision-Making Models in Human Resources Management: A Qualitative Research Study
by Southern, Craig E., Ph.D., Northcentral University, 2016, 275; 10244984
Abstract (Summary)

Decision making is among the chief liabilities and risks recurring foremost on a daily basis for human resources professionals in today’s workplace. Therefore, human resources professionals as decision makers are often required to be aware of, and comply with, a variety of subject matters, trends, concepts, issues, practices, and laws. For human resources professionals, decision making a core job function. The problem addressed in this study is how the absence of formal decision-making criteria specifically designed for the management of human resources can cause human resources professionals to make decisions that are above not only costly for organizations, but can increase their own personal liability and risk. The purpose of this qualitative research via multiple case study was to investigate how the absence of formal decision-making criteria specifically designed for the management of human resources can cause human resources professionals to make decisions that are often financially and perceptually costly for the organizations in which they work, and can also increase their own personal liability and risk. Additionally, the focus of this research study was to contribute new knowledge for the process of decision making as it pertained to the occupational field of human resources management. This qualitative multiple case study examined the perceptions and experiences of human resources professionals working within the public sector in state government in Georgia. The human resources professionals as participants represented varying levels of decision-making responsibility, inclusive of tax-based and revenue-generated entities from small, medium, and large organizational structures. Results from this research study provided insight for use to inform human resources professionals regarding the mostly negative impacts, effects, and outcomes as perceived and experienced by human resources professionals resulting from the absence of formal decision-making criteria specifically designed for the management of human resources. Examination of the data collected from participants regarding the actual decisions made resulting from the absence of decision-making criteria for the management of human resources highlighted evidence connecting the absence of formal decision-making criteria leading to mostly negative impacts, effects, and outcomes based upon perceptions or experiences. Such evidence via the claims by participants featured personal and organizational results that could be further studied against the backdrop of existing literature, albeit limited, to develop a formal decision-making process (i.e., model) inclusive of criteria specifically designed for the management of human resources to achieve results that lessen cost, mitigate liability, and avoid risk.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Fore, Jerome
Commitee: Schaefer, Thomas, Wardlow, Rebecca
School: Northcentral University
Department: School of Business and Technology Management
School Location: United States -- Arizona
Source: DAI-A 78/06(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Business administration, Management, Organizational behavior
Keywords: Attribution theory, Cause and effect, Decision making, Human resources management, Organizational behavior, Workplace liability and risk
Publication Number: 10244984
ISBN: 9781369408300