Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Political judgement and historiography: Making sense of experience
by Geirsdottir, Heidrun, M.A., The American University of Paris (France), 2010, 50; 10305870
Abstract (Summary)

The subject matter of this research project is Hannah Arendt’s presentation of the faculty of judgement within the context of history and historiography.

There are three pivotal questions which are central to the research. They are interrelated, and are all addressed with regard to Arendt’s conceptualisations of judgement and history, inferring from other relevant terms as they are presented by her, most importantly ‘action’ and ‘plurality.’ The first question indicates an analytical outset for the research, while the latter are aimed at a further examination of Arendt’s illustration of constitutive factors which can contribute to a concept of judgement in relation to history and historiography.

Those three questions are the following: 1. What kind of judgement is applied when “history” is written? 2. How does the faculty of judgement perform [seen in the context of historiography] when conceptualising or re-establishing past events? 3. How can a historical narrative enable people [individually or on a collective basis] to re-interpret their own past in order to construct a new vision for their future, [or prevent them from doing so]?

The key objective of the research is to produce a conceptual presentation, through analysis, of the role and function of [political] judgement and to develop a model for historiography, seen in the context of Hannah Arendt’s perception of history and the faculty of judgement.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor:
Commitee:
School: The American University of Paris (France)
School Location: France
Source: MAI 56/02M(E), Masters Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Islamic Studies, Middle Eastern Studies, International Relations
Keywords: Arendt, Hannah, Political judgement
Publication Number: 10305870
ISBN: 9781369494341
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