Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Syria: The emergence of a cool war?
by Schaefer, Janine Christine, M.A., The American University of Paris (France), 2014, 53; 10305859
Abstract (Summary)

This thesis analyses Russian foreign policy with its longest-lasting ally in the Middle East, Syria. It contends that the relationship between these two states is based on the client-state theory. Based on this theory it tries to explain Russia’s interests, actions and non-actions during the Syrian civil war. It will further highlight the client state theory’s impact on geopolitics and give reasons for why Russia shows support for the Syrian government, and why it ignores American intervention demands. The conflict of interests between the US and Russia is analyzed by studying both states’ foreign policy towards Syria. The thesis claims that due to these conflicts foreign relations between the US and Russia have suffered since the Syrian civil war.

Finally, the paper examines the cool war theory by comparing it to cold war theory to explain the cooling relations and rising tensions. It tries to solve the question whether a cool war is emerging between the two states due to conflicts of interests in Syria. Interviews with officials and specialists serve to validate that the cool war theory does not apply to the case of Syria. The thesis then finishes with the conclusion that Russian-US relations are not on the brink of a cool war: Rather the United States and Russia showed a great level of cooperation in solving the Syrian dispute and intensified their relations.

International Relations; Cool War Theory; Client States; Middle East; Foreign Policy

Indexing (document details)
Advisor:
Commitee:
School: The American University of Paris (France)
School Location: France
Source: MAI 56/02M(E), Masters Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: International Relations
Keywords: Client states, Cool war theory, Foreign policy, Middle East, Russia, United States
Publication Number: 10305859
ISBN: 9781369494235
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