Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Understanding Interdisciplinary Knowledge Experiences and Perspectives in Mind, Brain, and Education
by Knox, Rockey L. M., Ed.D., The George Washington University, 2017, 187; 10253268
Abstract (Summary)

Over the last two decades, the potential benefits of integrating cognitive and developmental neuroscience research with education research has resulted in the burgeoning new field of Mind, Brain, and Education. The purpose of this study was to explore the personal and professional learning experiences of individual academic researchers in order to identify potentially meaningful knowledge development experiences in Mind, Brain, and Education. Five Mind, Brain, and Education academic researchers were selected for participation based on their professional engagement and leadership activities in the field. Data was collected via in-depth, phenomenological personal interviews. Findings indicate that participants developed interdisciplinary knowledge tools through early exposure to interdisciplinary coursework, experience with applied research settings, and the utilization of institutional resources and flexibility throughout their doctoral and post-doctoral work. Recommendations for future Mind, Brain, and Education knowledge development programs include the explicit adoption of a transdisciplinary research framework, as well as the differentiation between translational and practitioner-focused programs.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Kochhar-Bryant, Carol
Commitee: Taymans, Juliana M., Wallace, Gregory L.
School: The George Washington University
Department: Special Education
School Location: United States -- District of Columbia
Source: DAI-A 78/06(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Neurosciences, Educational leadership
Keywords: Educational neuroscience, Higher education, Interdisciplinary, Knowledge development, Mind brain education, Transdisciplinary
Publication Number: 10253268
ISBN: 9781369513899
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