Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

The Decline of Maronite Political Power in Lebanon
by Schmitt, Alexandre, M.A., The American University of Paris (France), 2012, 62; 10305820
Abstract (Summary)

This paper analyzes the diminishing role of the Maronite Catholic elite in the political history of modern Lebanon. Beginning at the emergence of the state under the French mandate in 1920, a political system was established based on confessional identity that favored the Maronite community. Independence and the National Pact reinforced this tradition and placed a Maronite in the seat of president. Domestic and regional turmoil later combined to challenge the political system, and these confrontations led to the civil war that lasted from 1975 – 1990 and devastated much of the country. Following the Taif agreement and under Syrian occupation, Maronite political power and organization suffered significantly. The constitution, National Pact, and Taif agreement reflect respective changes to the authority structure in Lebanon, and the decreasing role of Maronites within it. Furthermore, the actions taken by the Maronite elite over the course of Lebanese history have played a significant role in the evolution of the state and how it responded to conflict.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor:
Commitee:
School: The American University of Paris (France)
Department: International Affairs
School Location: France
Source: MAI 56/02M(E), Masters Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: International Relations
Keywords: Decline, Lebanon, Maronite, Political, Power
Publication Number: 10305820
ISBN: 9781369493849
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