Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Direct attention training with a school-aged student with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and the implications for reading comprehension
by Schwab, Sarah-Jane, M.A., California State University, Long Beach, 2016, 97; 10196221
Abstract (Summary)

To date, research on direct attention training (DAT) has focused primarily on adult populations with considerable gaps regarding DAT for children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a DAT program, namely the Pay Attention! program, with a school-aged student with ADHD. The principle investigator hypothesized that this program would improve attention abilities on trained attention tasks, psychometric measures of attention, functional measures of attention, as well as improve reading comprehension abilities. A pre- and post-test single case study design was used to compare performance on impairment and participation-levels of attention, as well as measures of reading comprehension. Post-test results demonstrated improvement in accuracy or completion time on all impairment-level attention testing with some improvements noted on reading comprehension and measures at the participation level. These results contribute to existing research on DAT for children, as well as suggest that some generalization to participation-level activities and reading comprehension may be achieved.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Hung, Pei-Fang
Commitee: Garcia, Edward, Ngo, Bryanne L.
School: California State University, Long Beach
Department: Speech-Language Pathology
School Location: United States -- California
Source: MAI 56/02M(E), Masters Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Speech therapy, Health sciences, Cognitive psychology
Keywords: Attention process training, Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, Direct attention training, Pay Attention!, Reading comprehension
Publication Number: 10196221
ISBN: 9781369339352
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