Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Influence of Social and Cultural Capital including Language of English Learners on Student Engagement
by Scribner, Michelle, Ed.D., University of Redlands, 2016, 133; 10172296
Abstract (Summary)

English learners typically score below their English o0nly peers on state and national standardized tests, demonstrating that there is a need to explore possibilities as to why this achievement gap is widening. Applying a conceptual framework stemming from the concepts of social and cultural capital from sociologist Bourdieu, this study examines the language as social and cultural capital of English learners at a school site and its influence on student engagement. This qualitative study used narrative inquiry and a semi structured interview protocol to gain insights from teachers, students and district personnel. Although the findings in this study are not generalizable, it suggest language influences a student’s ability to be engaged in the classroom through access, relationships, trust, identity, success, and cultural diversity and awareness in this particular school site found in a local Southern California school district. Having a deeper understanding of how language, social and cultural capital influence engagement will assist educators in planning instructional lessons that are academically rigorous and relevant to the student in order to provide access and upward social mobility to English learner students.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Lalas, Jose
Commitee: Hamilton, Greg, Hunt, Chris, Miranda, Frank
School: University of Redlands
Department: School of Education
School Location: United States -- California
Source: DAI-A 78/04(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Educational sociology, English as a Second Language, Language
Keywords: Cultural capital, English language learners, Language, Social capital, Student engagement
Publication Number: 10172296
ISBN: 978-1-369-27086-0
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