Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Online mindful stress management for the military: A study using a civilian population
by Sorgi, Anthony, Psy.D., Adler School of Professional Psychology, 2016, 121; 10295735
Abstract (Summary)

This study examined whether an online adaptation of Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) that consisted of two brief exercises (body scan and breathing) could reduce perceived stress and increase traits of mindfulness in a sample of civilian employees who experience high stress. There were 205 employees who volunteered for the study. Using a stratified random assignment procedure, they were assigned to an intervention group and received an 8-week, online mindfulness training program, or to a control group and received their company's standard stress management program. Stress was measured using the Perceived Stress Scale; mindfulness was measured using the Five Facets of Mindfulness Questionnaire, Short Form. Measures were administered at pre- and post-test. A repeated measures ANOVA with group type as the between subjects factor indicated that the intervention (MBSR) group had significant reductions in stress, and significant increases in traits of mindfulness, compared to the control group. The results suggest that an online adaptation of the MBSR program can produce positive results that are comparable to those found in studies that used the full version of the program. The results demonstrate that a modified mindfulness training program could be used to address the mental health needs for military service members.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Ji, Peter
Commitee:
School: Adler School of Professional Psychology
School Location: United States -- Illinois
Source: DAI-B 78/04(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Psychology, Clinical psychology
Keywords: MBSR, Mindfulness, Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction, Online Mindfulness
Publication Number: 10295735
ISBN: 9781369388299
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