Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Quantification of oxidative reaction efficiencies for hydroxyl radical oxidized antibiotics
by Gilmore, Ariana G., M.S., California State University, Long Beach, 2017, 60; 10167512
Abstract (Summary)

The degradation efficiency for various beta-lactam antibiotics in water by the hydroxyl radical oxidation was investigated. The effectiveness of these reactions was quantified from the change in concentration of antibiotic solutions as a function of applied gamma-radiation dose. Antibiotic concentrations were determined using high performance liquid chromatography. A method for each compound was first established followed by determination of its limit of detection. Degradation efficiencies were quantitatively determined for a total of 13 antibiotic compounds from the penicillin and sulfonamide classes. Five membered ring penicillin compounds chosen for this study were determined to have hydroxyl radical degradation efficiencies ranging from 50.0 ± 8.3% to 95.0 ± 6.6%. Six membered ring penicillins ranged from 63.0 ± 4.6% to 75.1 ± 4.8%, and sulfonamide antibiotics had a range of 22.9 ± 7.3% to 59.8 ± 15.9%. The broad range of efficiency values between classes, along with similarities within each class, suggest similarities in the hydroxyl radical reaction mechanism and perhaps that the side group(s) dictated the overall compound degradation chemistry. Reasons for deviation from theoretical values are suggested, as well as some future work.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Mezyk, Stephen P.
Commitee: Brazier, Christopher R., Derakhshan, Shahab
School: California State University, Long Beach
Department: Chemistry and Biochemistry
School Location: United States -- California
Source: MAI 56/02M(E), Masters Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Physical chemistry
Keywords: Chemical physics, Oxidative radicals, Radical chemistry
Publication Number: 10167512
ISBN: 9781369218619
Copyright © 2019 ProQuest LLC. All rights reserved. Terms and Conditions Privacy Policy Cookie Policy
ProQuest