Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Psychological Media Effects of Narrative Transportation in Advertising
by Byrne, Betsy A., M.S., University of Louisiana at Lafayette, 2016, 70; 10163320
Abstract (Summary)

Cultivation theory suggests that using second-order judgments, viewers may become immersed into a narrative program via narrative transportation. Highly transported viewers make very frequent trait judgments, forming impressions and attitudes about characters, anticipating outcomes, and making constant reevaluations when surprises occur. Narrative transportation can often lead to persuasion by bringing viewers to a highly involved mental state. Due to narrative transportation’s persuasive quality, research has reviewed the relationship of narrative transportation within advertisements

This research will build on the literature by examining the extent to which narrative transportation intervenes with the viewer’s attitude towards the Dr. Pepper brand via product placement, incorporating individual difference variables of materialism, cognitive attention, and need for fantasy. The two-group posttest only with a control group experiment manipulates the variables through two different viewing programs. The first program induces narrative transportation, while the second program is interrupted so that there is no narrative flow.

Volunteer participants will be selected from CMCN 100 classes. A simple linear regression will be used to determine the effects of immersion.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Dinu, Lucian
Commitee: Ferguson, Alice, Winters, Caryn
School: University of Louisiana at Lafayette
Department: Communication
School Location: United States -- Louisiana
Source: MAI 56/01M(E), Masters Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Communication, Cognitive psychology, Mass communications
Keywords: Advertising, Cognitive capacity, Fantasy realization theory, Flow theory, Narrative transportation, Psychology
Publication Number: 10163320
ISBN: 9781369180121
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