Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

The Use of Wavelet Energy Absorption to Estimate Hydrocarbon Saturation in the North Lissie Field of Wharton County, TX
by Angelo, Jared Michael, M.S., University of Louisiana at Lafayette, 2016, 106; 10163347
Abstract (Summary)

The seismic attribute High-Frequency Absorption (HFA) is a method of evaluating the absorptive properties of rocks as nonstationary wavelets pass through the substrate. This technique is used today as a direct hydrocarbon indicator, where it should be used as a diagnostic tool in conjunction with several other geophysical and geological processes for the delineation of hydrocarbon reservoirs. Understanding the absorptive properties of target reservoirs and correlating their geophysical aspects to geologic properties, courtesy of well logs, may allow us to interpret patterns between hydrocarbon saturation and HFA on local reservoir scales. The ability to estimate hydrocarbon saturation can significantly affect the risk evaluations of potential prospects and further increase our rate of success when wildcatting or developing fields. Analysis shows that in this particular project, proper data, such as neutron-density logs, are seldom run in the wells of this area, thus making estimation of water/hydrocarbons very difficult and very inaccurate. Other complications include the resolution of seismic data compared to well log data. Due to these obstacles, high-resolution correlations of HFA to hydrocarbon saturation proved to be unsuccessful. However, association of proven vs. false prospects showed very high correlations to HFA signatures.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Zhang, Rui
Commitee: Kinsland, Gary, Richter, Carl
School: University of Louisiana at Lafayette
Department: Geology
School Location: United States -- Louisiana
Source: MAI 56/02M(E), Masters Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Geology, Geophysics
Keywords: Attenuation, High frequency attenuation, Wavelet energy absorption
Publication Number: 10163347
ISBN: 9781369180398
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