Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Fine Arts Coursework and Student Achievement Among African-American Students in a Midwest Setting
by Erwin, Douglas, Ed.D., Lindenwood University, 2016, 140; 10244375
Abstract (Summary)

The researcher designed this study to investigate a possible correlation between the number of years of fine arts coursework and achievement on the American College Test (ACT). The district studied was predominantly African American; therefore, similar schools may use the results to plan strategies to reduce the achievement gap. Results included a mild positive correlation between student ACT achievement and coursework in visual arts, and a moderate correlation between ACT achievement and performing arts. The more fine arts coursework a student received, the higher his or her ACT score. The researcher conducted a z-test for difference in means to compare the ACT scores of students with two or more years of fine arts to the district population’s average ACT score. The researcher found significant statistical difference in ACT scores. Finally, the researcher conducted a z-test for difference in means to see if number of years of fine arts coursework correlated to student achievement on each of the ACT sub tests: English, Math, Reading, and Science. The researcher found students with two or more years of arts coursework scored higher on each sub test than students who only took one required year of fine arts. The researcher noted this study could be important to curricular programming and increased student achievement in the future.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Leavitt, Lynda
Commitee: Isenberg, Susan, Wisdom, Sherrie
School: Lindenwood University
Department: Education
School Location: United States -- Missouri
Source: DAI-A 78/04(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Art education, Educational tests & measurements
Keywords: Achievement gap, African-American students, Student achievement, Visual arts
Publication Number: 10244375
ISBN: 9781369376029
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