Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Political identification of STEM workers in the US
by Davidson, Zachary P., M.A., University of Nevada, Reno, 2016, 57; 10161306
Abstract (Summary)

The world is increasingly moving toward a technology- and information-based economy. With this change, a growing occupational category involves working in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM). What is the political identification of STEM workers? Quantitative work has shown that professionals, in general, are moving toward the Democratic Party (see, e.g. Hout, Brooks, and Manza 1995); but a qualitative interview-based study suggested that STEM workers, specifically, may be more conservative than others (Zussman 1985). The primary purpose of this study is to bring quantitative analyses to bear on this question to determine if STEM workers, are, indeed, more conservative than others. A secondary purpose is to begin explaining why they are more conservative, if such a pattern is found. The primary research hypothesis follows Zussman (1985) and predicts that STEM workers are significantly more conservative than other workers; a secondary hypothesis is that this significant difference will remain even when controlling for key demographic variables. Regression analyses provide support for both hypotheses, which suggests that STEM workers are, indeed, more conservative than others—a pattern that may be rooted in the structure of their work, a la Kohn (1989).

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Peoples, Clayton D.
Commitee: Evans, Mariah D. R., Miller, Monica K.
School: University of Nevada, Reno
Department: Sociology
School Location: United States -- Nevada
Source: MAI 56/01M(E), Masters Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Economics, Political science, Sociology
Keywords: Economic restructuring, Knowledge economy, Occupations and professions, Political identification, STEM workers
Publication Number: 10161306
ISBN: 9781369161885
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