Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Reactions to Transgender Job Applicants: Implications of Gender Orientation on Hiring Decisions, Salary Recommendation, Agency, and Communality
by Wilson, Daniel J., M.A., Southern Illinois University at Edwardsville, 2016, 65; 10159235
Abstract (Summary)

In recent years, growing attention has been paid to the subtle forms of discrimination towards disadvantaged groups that occur in the work place. The result has been a growing understanding of the underlying stereotypes and biases that affect social interaction and decision-making. However, there is currently still a dearth of research addressing the stereotypes that affect transgender individuals in the workplace. This is of particular concern as sources suggest transgender individuals often feel as though their gender identity hinders their employment opportunities. This study sought to address that issue by exploring perceptions of agency and communality in the decision to hire and recommend salary to an openly transgender job applicant. This study examined this by having individuals rate their impression of either a transgender or cisgender job applicant’s agency, communality, and eligibility for a provided position. Results suggested that although being transgender did not affect perceptions of hireability or salary recommendations, being transgender did influence perceived agentic and communal traits negatively. These results provide implications for openly transgender job applicants who are hesitant to disclose their gender identity in the application process.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Bartels, Lynn
Commitee: Daus, Catherine, Dudley, Michael
School: Southern Illinois University at Edwardsville
Department: Psychology
School Location: United States -- Illinois
Source: MAI 56/01M(E), Masters Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Social psychology, GLBT Studies, Psychology, Labor relations
Keywords:
Publication Number: 10159235
ISBN: 9781369142266
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