Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Suriname's identity construction and negotiation
by Castillo, Danielle C., M.A., California State University, Long Beach, 2016, 80; 10147310
Abstract (Summary)

Located in South America, and being a post-colonial Dutch colony, Suriname has an ethnically diverse population of transplants. After its independence in 1975, Suriname underwent gruesome civil unrest while ruled by a Militia coup that killed specific ethnic groups for claiming their own identities, juxtaposed to its acceptance of ethnic diversity. The film, Suriname’s Identity Construction and Negotiation by Danielle Celeste Castillo, follows a select group of people who claim to be Surinamese and something else, as they reject or claim prescribed forms of identities further negating ethnicity and nationality’s relationship with a person’s internal and external selves. This project shows identity is fluid and also fixed depending on the context while also expanding anthropological, psychological and sociological works on ethnic and national identities.

Supplemental Files

Some files may require a special program or browser plug-in. More Information

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: LeMaster, Barbara
Commitee: Rousso-Schindler, Steven, Wilson, R. Scott
School: California State University, Long Beach
Department: Anthropology
School Location: United States -- California
Source: MAI 56/01M(E), Masters Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Cultural anthropology, Ethnic studies, Film studies
Keywords: Ethnicity, External self, Identity construction, Internal self, Nationalism, Visual anthropology
Publication Number: 10147310
ISBN: 9781369025354
Copyright © 2018 ProQuest LLC. All rights reserved. Terms and Conditions Privacy Policy Cookie Policy
ProQuest