Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Blurred lines: When does a psychologist's personal relationship become professional?
by Ritcheson, John, M.A., Southern Illinois University at Edwardsville, 2016, 56; 10147580
Abstract (Summary)

Providing psychotherapy to an individual with whom the therapist has a pre-established personal relationship is considered a multiple relationship by the American Psychological Association (APA) (American Psychological Association, 2010; Fisher, 2013). Mental health clinicians consider providing therapy to a friend, co-worker, employee, and individuals with other pre-established social relationship to be unethical (Borys and Pope, 1989; Pope & Keith-Spiegel, 1987; Sanders, Swenson III, & Schneller, 2011), while most clinicians reported rarely providing such services to the previously mentioned individuals (Sanders, et al. 2011). The aforementioned results provide support for the kinds of multiple relationships therapists should not engage in. However, research still has not pinpointed what kinds of interactions are considered therapy. For practical purposes we only considered the type of interaction/therapy technique and if psychologists and undergraduate students rate the ethicality of hypothetical interactions differently based on the type of therapeutic orientation/technique. The current study found that psychologist may have different perceptions of what is considered therapeutic/professional in nature and ethical in nature.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Pomerantz, Andrew M.
Commitee: Ro, Eunyoe, Segrist, Daniel J.
School: Southern Illinois University at Edwardsville
Department: Psychology
School Location: United States -- Illinois
Source: MAI 56/01M(E), Masters Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Clinical psychology
Keywords: Ethics, Multiple relationships, Personal relationships, Therapeutic relationships, Therapy
Publication Number: 10147580
ISBN: 9781369028058
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