Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Purifying the body: Contemporary notions of purity and pollution concerning intersex persons
by Zazueta, Suzette E., M.A., California State University, Long Beach, 2016, 153; 10131634
Abstract (Summary)

There is little research into the effect religion may have on the gender assignment of intersex persons. This research addresses that issue, exploring the possible roots of contemporary gender assignment practices in ancient notions of purity and pollution, or purity rules, and argues that such customs or norms influence contemporary perspectives and attitudes surrounding gender identity. This work examines the practice of gender assignment of intersex persons in the “Western” world, along with any and all associated medical procedures and the teaching of gender performance and the adoption of gender performance by the subjects, and suggests that the practice of gender assignment is, in fact, a ritual practice stemming from western notions of purity and pollution surrounding the body, specifically, gender as it relates to the body. Finally, this work concludes that the “Western” notion of purity and pollution which frame the ritual practice of gender assignment, have failed to evolve despite advances in science, psychology and social ethics and thus, this ritual practice needs to be seriously reexamined.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Stewart, David T.
Commitee: Dahab, Elizabeth, Lowentrout, Peter, Pandya, Sophia
School: California State University, Long Beach
Department: Religious Studies
School Location: United States -- California
Source: MAI 55/06M(E), Masters Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Religion, Womens studies, Medical Ethics, Gender studies
Keywords: Gender identity, Gender purity ritual, Intersex, Sexuality
Publication Number: 10131634
ISBN: 9781339894058
Copyright © 2019 ProQuest LLC. All rights reserved. Terms and Conditions Privacy Policy Cookie Policy
ProQuest