Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

The effect of emotion regulation on stress and the role of executive function
by Latronica, Amber N., M.A., California State University, Long Beach, 2016, 72; 10131676
Abstract (Summary)

Repeated exposure to stress has been associated with negative health outcomes. The present study investigated how different emotion regulation strategies—cognitive reappraisal and suppression—are associated with stress and how executive function may influence these relationships. Thirty two women, all mothers with young children, were assessed using the emotion regulation questionnaire, the affective go/no go task, and salivary cortisol collection. Cognitive reappraisal was not significantly related to stress. Greater endorsement of suppression was significantly associated with two measures of stress—increased output of daily cortisol and increased cortisol awakening response. Executive function was not a significant moderator. This is the first study to date to examine these questions and to assess them in a naturalistic setting with a sample of mothers with young children. Given that mothers regularly experience emotion-eliciting situations, these results have several implications for how emotion regulation strategies may impact stress (cortisol levels) in this population.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Urizar, Guido G.
Commitee: Cho, Young-Hee, Lee, Diane W.
School: California State University, Long Beach
Department: Psychology
School Location: United States -- California
Source: MAI 55/06M(E), Masters Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Mental health, Endocrinology, Social psychology, Personality psychology, Cognitive psychology
Keywords: Cortisol, Emotion, Emotion regulation, Executive function, Stress
Publication Number: 10131676
ISBN: 9781339894478
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