Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Made in China: Chinese export art and its European reception in the seventeenth century
by Wang, Shuning, M.A., Tulane University, 2016, 97; 10128383
Abstract (Summary)

This thesis considers the process of transcultural mediation in seventeenth-century Chinese export art objects and their European remediations. It consists of case studies, considering tapestries and ceramics made for the Portuguese and the Dutch markets. These objects were selected due to the fact that their production was directly commissioned from Chinese makers by Europeans, and thus were always conceived as transcultural mediations. During the seventeenth century, the supply of Chinese goods to Europe was on the rise yet Europeans still perceived the Chinese style as “decidedly aristocratic.” Europeans who commissioned objects from China or objects intended to look like they were Chinese in origin tried to strike a balance between the supposed “Chinese-ness” of the objects and their own European identities. During the course of the seventeenth century, this perception of “Chinese-ness” gradually shifted away from the materiality of individual art objects to a more general concept of the exotic, which in the following centuries developed into the style of Chinoiserie. These two forms of “Chinese-ness” can often coexist. The European patrons often evoked “Chinese-ness” differently, depending on their individual cultural and social contexts.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Porras, Stephanie
Commitee: Boone, Elizabeth, Schweizer, Anton
School: Tulane University
Department: Art History
School Location: United States -- Louisiana
Source: MAI 55/06M(E), Masters Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: History, European history, Art history
Keywords: China, Dutch East India Company, Early modern globalization, Portugal, Transcultural mediation
Publication Number: 10128383
ISBN: 9781339863955