Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Borne of capitalism: Razing compulsory education by raising children with popular and village wisdom
by Santa Cruz, Darlane E., Ph.D., The University of Arizona, 2016, 145; 10147542
Abstract (Summary)

This multi-modal dissertation examines the historical hegemonic making of U.S. education, and how compulsory schooling has framed acceptable notions of culture, language/literacy, and knowledge production. Through this criticism of colonization and education, theoretical and practical alternatives are explored for the opportunities outside mainstream schooling in the US. In examining the literary work on decolonizing education, these efforts can engage in unlearning of coloniality by finding examples from a time before colonization. In contemporary society, the practice of de/unschooling can hold the possibilities for decolonizing education. To demonstrate how families of color in the U.S. engage with unschooling, interview questions serve as the sharing of knowledge and experience so as to ground the research in lived reality. A brief survey of critical education and critical pedagogy broadens those already critical of schools and/or receptive to the criticism of schools and the un/deschooling alternative then places student and family/community as the center of learning and teaching.

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Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Moll, Luis
Commitee: Cajete, Gregory, Gonzales, Patrisia, Nicholas, Sheilah
School: The University of Arizona
Department: Language, Reading & Culture
School Location: United States -- Arizona
Source: DAI-A 77/12(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Education, Native American studies, Education philosophy
Keywords: Auto ethnography, Chicanx/indigenous, Decolonizing education, Deschooling, Mothering, Unschooling
Publication Number: 10147542
ISBN: 9781369027679
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