Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

An ecological study of instructor views of free use multitasking with digital devices in the classroom
by Week, Sandra McElrath, Ph.D., University of Nevada, Reno, 2016, 196; 10126080
Abstract (Summary)

University instructors experience continual technological change that affects their classroom teaching and their relationships with students. Few studies have been conducted regarding instructor views about student off-task multitasking during class. This study used a qualitative design with a phenomenological approach to discover meaning that instructors attribute to the challenges they encounter in dealing with student information and communications device use in the university classroom. Bronfenbenner’s (1990) ecological systems theory was used as a lens to organize and bring understanding to data collected from participant interviews, classroom observation, and syllabus inspection. The design of the study was different than any studies found to date as it triangulated instructor interviews with syllabi and observational data. Twelve participants who teach freshman-and sophomore-level core curriculum classes from a western university were included in the study. Information accumulated in this study supported some of the current research, but was in direct opposition to other research. The findings provide practical recommendations and many new opportunities for future research.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Laden, Rita
Commitee: Barone, Diane, Hill, George, Kuechler, William, Sanchez, Jafeth
School: University of Nevada, Reno
Department: Educational Leadership
School Location: United States -- Nevada
Source: DAI-A 77/12(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Educational leadership, Education Policy, School administration, Educational technology
Keywords: Classroom distractions, Digital immigrants, Flow theory, Instructor views, Multitasking, Student engagement
Publication Number: 10126080
ISBN: 9781339841380
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