Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Are Women Opting Out of STEM Leadership Positions? The Impact of Stereotype Threat, Internalized Sexism, and Leadership Self-Efficacy on Women in STEM
by Locke, Janna, M.A., Southern Illinois University at Edwardsville, 2016, 79; 10125488
Abstract (Summary)

Due to the discrepancy that still exists between men and women in STEM careers and in leadership positions within those STEM careers, the current study examined the relationship that perceptions of stereotype threat and internalized sexism have on women’s decisions to advance or continue in their STEM career. Additionally, the current study examined whether women’s decisions to advance or continue in a STEM career could be impacted by their levels of leadership self-efficacy. Those results were then compared to women in gender neutral careers to determine the impact that these variables have on women in STEM careers compared to women in gender neutral careers.160 women in STEM and gender neutral careers were surveyed, with 90 of those women working in a STEM field, and 70 of those women working in a gender neutral field. Results revealed that perceptions of stereotype threat for women in STEM were positively related to their levels of internalized sexism, that leadership self-efficacy significantly moderated the relationship between perceptions of stereotype threat and internalized sexism for women in STEM, and that leadership self-efficacy for women in STEM was positively related to their intentions to advance or continue in their career. Exploratory analyses suggested that perceptions of stereotype threat and internalized sexism were both significantly related to advancement for women in STEM. These results yielded practical implications for organizations regarding the gender gap in STEM and in leadership positions within STEM careers, along with possible future research that should be conducted on the concept to further understand why this gender gap exists.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Nadler, Joel T.
Commitee: Bartels, Lynn, Dudley, Michael
School: Southern Illinois University at Edwardsville
Department: Psychology
School Location: United States -- Illinois
Source: MAI 55/05M(E), Masters Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Womens studies, Organizational behavior, Gender studies
Keywords: Advancement, Gender, Leadership, Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics
Publication Number: 10125488
ISBN: 9781339835617
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