Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Exploring the Implementation of International Environmental Treaties: A Quantitative Study of the Kyoto Protocol
by Gabossy, Bendegtiiz, M.A., Webster University, 2016, 68; 10140396
Abstract (Summary)

There have been a number of efforts to coordinate climate change issues at the global level, however, many scholars doubt the effectiveness of governing climate policies through international agreements. Two competing theories, regime theory and the realist approaches of international relations represent the core concepts in this study of why and how to achieve better implementation and thereby decreased CO2 emissions through international cooperation. This study looks into two competing predictions regarding the effectiveness of Kyoto protocol. One hypothesis predicts that countries that ratify the Kyoto Protocol will have lower CO2 emissions, whereas the other hypothesis predicts that more powerful states are less likely to implement the Kyoto Protocol. I use cross section time series data by looking at 197 countries in the period from 1990 to 2012, which . was the end of the first Kyoto commitment period. The study finds that democracy levels and power of states, as well as wealth of states, have a significant effect on implementation of the Kyoto Protocol. More powerful states are likely to emit more carbon dioxide, while states that ratified the Kyoto Protocol are likely to emit less carbon dioxide.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Brutschin, Elina
Commitee:
School: Webster University
School Location: United States -- Missouri
Source: MAI 55/05M(E), Masters Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: International law
Keywords: Analysis, Effectiveness, Kyoto, Quantitative, Theory, Treaty
Publication Number: 10140396
ISBN: 978-1-339-95794-4
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