Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

International policy experience: Short term international travel courses in structure degree programs
by Clayton, Kirk Marshall, Ed.D., Pepperdine University, 2016, 177; 10141729
Abstract (Summary)

This descriptive quantitative research examined 7 years of data to find what are the benefits, challenges, and outcomes of short-term international travel courses in a structured degree program in the organizational leadership, doctoral program at Pepperdine University Graduate School of Education and Psychology from 2007 to 2014. While there is currently a plethora of study abroad research, most of the existing research explores semester or academic-year programs. Very few studies have investigated shorter durations or students’ perceptions and experiences during these programs or their experiences with, self-identified encounters during these courses. This study aimed to alleviate the dearth of information.

The main purpose of the study was to determine what were: • the personal characteristics of students who participated in short-term, course-based, international travels in structured degree programs? • the perceived benefits experienced by students who participated in short-term, course-based, international travels in structured degree programs? • the perceived shortcomings experienced by students who participated in short-term, course-based, international travels in structured degree programs? • the perceived challenges faced by students who participated in short-term, course-based, international travels in structured degree program. • the major areas of perceived learning by students who participated in short-term, course-based, international travels in structured degree programs? • the changes recommended for improving these programs?

The study found that 91% of the participants favored the logistical components of the trips; 91% were very satisfied with the trip selected; 93% felt that the lead faculty member’s level of academic experience was high; 93% indicated that they felt safe and hotel accommodations were good; and 100% felt that overall the program was effective. Weaknesses were post -trip debriefing of important learning during the trip scored (20%), reading materials about the trip scored 14%, evaluation of assignments and supplemental material including, handout and videos about the trip scored 26%, and 46% of the participants said academic demands were weak. This study provides useful information that can help determine whether or not international trips in structured degree programs are meeting their intended goals and objectives; whether or not there are areas of improvement with the EDOL short-term study-abroad programs from the student’s point of view.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Madjidi, Farzin
Commitee: Ramirez, June S., Tobin, John
School: Pepperdine University
Department: Education
School Location: United States -- California
Source: DAI-A 77/11(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Educational leadership, Education Policy
Keywords: International policy, Short-term travel, Structured degree programs
Publication Number: 10141729
ISBN: 9781339970813
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