Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

A phenomenological study of maternal influence on the leadership development of women presidents at institutions of higher learning
by Vondrasek, Tammy A., Ed.D., Saint Mary's University of Minnesota, 2015, 206; 10112040
Abstract (Summary)

This phenomenological qualitative study explored the lived experiences of American women university and college presidents to understand the maternal influence on their leadership development. This study was conducted by interviewing 20 women presidents from traditional four-year public and private universities in the United States. The interviews probed the complexities and processes involved in examining the maternal relationship, while seeking to understand the maternal influence on the leadership development of women university and college presidents. Each story presented maternal influences which emerged into six main themes including: mothers as center of family, mothers instill a personal value system, mothers as a role model, mothers encourage achievement, mothers offer support, and other women who influence. Mothers had a direct influence on leadership development and when mothers were absent, other women substituted the maternal influence to fill the maternal void offering acceptance and support. The findings from this study contribute new knowledge to the field of leadership development and may help women prepare for leadership positions, increasing their potential for success.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Hines, Sue
Commitee: Feder-Lewis, Sonia N., Germundsen, Rich, Holey, Linka
School: Saint Mary's University of Minnesota
Department: Leadership
School Location: United States -- Minnesota
Source: DAI-A 77/11(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Higher Education Administration, Educational leadership, Womens studies
Keywords: Higher education, Leadership development, Maternal influence, University presidents, Women
Publication Number: 10112040
ISBN: 9781339752136
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