Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

The relationships between a dedicated education unit and quality of nursing care
by Tochterman, Lori A., Ph.D., Washington State University, 2016, 94; 10139770
Abstract (Summary)

The Dedicated Education Unit (DEU) is a model of clinical teaching which has gained widespread acceptance and national recognition as an innovative method of clinical education for undergraduate nursing students (Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, 2010; Warner & Burton, 2009). The primary goals and benefits of the DEU for schools of nursing are expansion of educational capacity within a nursing faculty shortage and increased clinical placements while providing a high quality experiential learning environment (Murray, Crain, Meyer, McDonough, & Schweiss, 2010). Registered nurses (RNs) are the key component in the DEU clinical teaching model and serve as preceptors and valuable role models. Nurse preceptors are caught in challenging situations where they experience significant pressures to deliver quality nursing care under heavy workloads and are responsible for teaching and supervising students. The current quasi-experimental, investigational study reveals the relationships between the DEU model and the quality of patient care. Utilizing the nursing sensitive indicators of nursing hours per patient day — Registered Nurse, hospital acquired pressure ulcer rates, patient fall rates, and medication error rates, the study found no negative impact on the quality of patient care provided on DEUs despite the increased workload for precepting registered nurses.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Ward, Kelly
Commitee: Gates, Gordon S., Neider, Xyanthe N.
School: Washington State University
Department: Educational Leadership
School Location: United States -- Washington
Source: DAI-A 77/11(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Educational evaluation, Nursing
Keywords: Dedicated education unit, Quality of nursing care
Publication Number: 10139770
ISBN: 978-1-339-95253-6
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