Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

An investigation of the effect of steam cleaning and aluminum oxide treatment on the wettability and surface free energy of alloys commonly used in dentistry
by Sutton, Kirk C., M.S., The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, 2015, 66; 10137632
Abstract (Summary)

Purpose: The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate the effect of aluminum oxide airborne particle abrasion, with and without subsequent steam cleaning on the surface free energy of alloys commonly used in dentistry, in an attempt to produce optimal surfaces for adhesion. Materials and Methods: Twelve samples, with dimensions 13 x 18 x 1 mm, of each: Type IV high noble gold alloy, metal ceramic gold-palladium high noble alloy, chrome-cobalt base metal alloy were cast and divested with glass bead airborne particle abrasion. Twelve samples, with dimensions 13 x 18 x 10 mm, of titanium alloy were milled using an Origin Proteus 5x Milling Machine. Samples were treated with 1) Steam cleaning only, 2) Aluminum oxide airborne particle abrasion and 3) Aluminum oxide airborne particle abrasion with subsequent steam cleaning. Contact angle measurements were recorded immediately after each treatment and at 1 and 12 hours, using a goniometer and the sessile drop method. Surface free energy was calculated using VCA Optima XE software.

Results: Steam cleaning treatment showed no significant changes in surface free energy (dynes/cm), compared to pretreatment values for the alloys investigated except Titanium alloy, which showed a modest increase in surface energy (p < 0.05). Aluminum oxide airborne particle abrasion and aluminum oxide airborne particle abrasion with steam cleaning, resulted in an increase in surface free energy for all alloys investigated when compared to pretreatment and steam clean only values. Steam cleaning following airborne particle abrasion produced significantly lower (p<0.001) surface free energy values compared to airborne particle abrasion alone for high noble gold alloy and metal ceramic gold-palladium high noble alloy. Exposure to ambient air following steam cleaning had minimal or non-enduring effects on surface free energy for all alloys investigated except Titanium alloy, which showed a significant decrease (p<0.001) in surface free energy with time of ambient exposure. Exposure to ambient air following airborne particle abrasion with aluminum oxide resulted in a significant decrease (p<0.001) in surface free energy for high noble gold alloy, metal ceramic gold-palladium high noble alloy and chrome-cobalt base metal alloy, however, Titanium alloy showed no ambient exposure effects. Ambient exposure following aluminum oxide airborne particle abrasion with steam cleaning resulted in a significant decrease (p<0.001) in surface free energy for all alloys investigated.

Conclusions: Within the limitations of this study, it was found that aluminum oxide airborne particle abrasion, with and without subsequent steam cleaning, significantly increased the surface free energy of the dental alloys investigated. Steam cleaning following aluminum oxide airborne particle abrasion significantly reduced the surface free energy gain that the high noble alloys experienced with aluminum oxide airborne particle abrasion alone. And finally, exposure to ambient air following aluminum oxide airborne particle abrasion with and without subsequent steam cleaning resulted in a significant decrease in surface free energy for most alloys investigated.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Haney, Stephan J.
Commitee: Jones, John D., Mansueto, Michael, Prihoda, Thomas, Rawls, H. Ralph
School: The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio
Department: Biomedical Engineering
School Location: United States -- Texas
Source: MAI 55/05M(E), Masters Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Biomedical engineering, Dentistry, Materials science
Keywords: Adhesion, Adsorption, Contact angle, Contamination, Surface energy, Wettability
Publication Number: 10137632
ISBN: 9781339933214
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