Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Supporting Intrinsic Motivation for Special Education Students to Meet Graduation Requirements
by Frazier, Robert Sipplin, Ed.D., Piedmont College, 2015, 155; 10112387
Abstract (Summary)

This qualitative study examined how teachers use instructional practices and family reinforcement interventions to support intrinsic motivation for special education students as a means to meet graduation requirements. Purposeful sampling of highly qualified special education teachers certified in language arts was used in this study. The data were collected through three teacher participant interviews, classroom observations, and a collection of documents and artifacts.

The findings are presented and discussed through the three main themes that emerged from data analysis and interpretation. Three main themes described instructional practices used to support intrinsic motivation for special education students as a means to meet requirements for graduation: collaboration, relevant/meaningful learning, and relationships. One main theme described how teachers use family support interventions to provide intrinsic motivation for special education students as a means to meet requirements for graduation: open/transparent communication. This study adds to the body of literature regarding instructional practices and family support interventions to support intrinsic motivation as a means of meeting graduation requirements.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Moody, Mike
Commitee: Jordan, Joan A., McDaniel, Andie M.
School: Piedmont College
Department: School of Education
School Location: United States -- Georgia
Source: DAI-A 77/10(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Pedagogy, Special education, Secondary education
Keywords: Education, Intrinsic, Motivation
Publication Number: 10112387
ISBN: 9781339755410
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