Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Fontana Community Health Assessment
by Guevarra, Crystle, M.S.H.S., Western University of Health Sciences, 2015, 59; 10112508
Abstract (Summary)

Obesity often arises from poor diet and lack of exercise. Food deserts, in particular, cause people to develop poor eating habits because of the limited healthy food options and availability to cheap fast food chains. People affected by food deserts are usually found in communities of color and low-income areas. The purpose of the study was to identify whether Fontana residents are willing to adopt healthier lifestyles based on the perceptions about their own health and the health of the community. Mixed method research was utilized for the study. The participants in the study included adult residents of both sexes and all ethnic backgrounds from the City of Fontana. Those participants ranged in ages from 18 and above. The data results proved some significance between Fontana residents' will to adopt healthier lifestyles and their perceptions on personal and community health. The bivariate correlation tests indicated a statistical significance between the tested variables despite their small correlations and large unshared variances. The ANOVA tests aided with proving the validity of the proposed hypotheses. Based on the data findings, the null hypothesis was rejected and alternative hypothesis was accepted. For future research on getting residents to be more proactive about their health and that of the community, shorter and simpler surveys were advised.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Mann, Jeanine
Commitee: Meyer, Tina, Sellen, David
School: Western University of Health Sciences
Department: Allied Health
School Location: United States -- California
Source: MAI 55/05M(E), Masters Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Health sciences, Public health, Epidemiology
Keywords: Fast food, Food deserts, Healthy lifestyle, Obesity
Publication Number: 10112508
ISBN: 9781339756622
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