Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Mathematical teachers' perception: Mobile learning and constructing 21st century collaborative cloud-computing environments in elementary public schools in the State of Kuwait
by Alqallaf, Nadeyah, Ph.D., University of Northern Colorado, 2016, 214; 10113607
Abstract (Summary)

The purpose of this study was to examine Kuwaiti mathematical elementary teachers’ perceptions about their ability to integrate M-learning (mobile learning) into their current teaching practices and the major barriers hindering teachers’ ability to create an M-learning environment. Furthermore, this study sought to understand teachers’ perceptions about their ability to create a collaborative cloud-computing learning environment that corresponds with the 21st century skills and possibly explain their readiness for future reformation of education in Kuwait.

Using an Internet-based format to this study quantitative and qualitative data, the Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge (TPACK) and barriers survey gleaned quantitative information about how mathematics teachers and a head of a mathematics department (n = 562) viewed use of technology as well as the barriers they faced in integrating it into the classroom. Also, qualitative data were collected using a survey of open-ended questions to provide context to survey answers and better understand the barriers and affordance experienced by the participants. Moreover, a 21st century open-ended questionnaire was employed to collect qualitative information from mathematics teachers and head of the departments (n = 21) in regard the their ability to construct a 21st century learning environment based on collaboration and constructivist perspective utilizing a cloud-computing technology.

Quantitative analysis was utilized to examine elementary mathematics teachers’ perceptions using the TPACK survey, and the validity and reliability of the TPACK subscales were computed by administering the confirmatory factor analysis. Factors that were elicited were specified as: all seven subscales encompassed in the TPACK survey significantly fit model of factor structures, and the TPACK survey was reliable and valid. In addition, descriptive analysis such as the TPACK subscale means and standard deviations were computed via the SPSS software.

Qualitative content analysis was used to understand teachers’ perceptions about their ability to integrate mobile technology, perceptions of the primary barriers and affordance that limited their ability, and their perceptions of their ability to integrate collaborative cloud computing and create a 21st century learning environment based on the constructivist perspective. When analyzed, the self-reported open-ended survey yielded the following specific themes: (a) teachers perceived themselves high in their ability to integrate mobile technology; (b) the primary barriers based on teachers’ perceptions were budget constraints, IT limitations, time constraints, and administrative support; and (c) teachers perceived themselves high in their ability to integrate collaborative cloud computing to construct a 21st century learning environment based on the constructivist perspective. This study finding could be implemented to create a new modern mathematics elementary curriculum that resolves the current curriculum issues. Future research is recommended in the direction of creating a new mathematical curriculum based on administrators’, parents’, and students’ perspectives.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Williams, Mia
Commitee: Harding, Jenni, Kendrick, David, Kyser, Christine
School: University of Northern Colorado
Department: Educational Technology
School Location: United States -- Colorado
Source: DAI-A 77/10(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Mathematics education, Educational technology
Keywords: Cloud computing, Collaboration, Mathematics, Mobile learning, TPACK
Publication Number: 10113607
ISBN: 9781339766836
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