Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Polarization optical components of the Daniel K. Inouye Solar Telescope
by Sueoka, Stacey Ritsuyo, Ph.D., The University of Arizona, 2016, 168; 10116376
Abstract (Summary)

The Daniel K Inouye Solar Telescope (DKIST), when completed in 2019 will be the largest solar telescope built to date. DKIST will have a suite of first light polarimetric instrumentation requiring broadband polarization modulation and calibration optical elements. Compound crystalline retarders meet the design requirements for efficient modulators and achromatic calibration retarders. These retarders are the only possible large diameter optic that can survive the high flux, 5 arc minute field, and ultraviolet intense environment of a large aperture solar telescope at Gregorian focus.

This dissertation presents work performed for the project. First, I measured birefringence of the candidate materials necessary to complete designs. Then, I modeled the polarization effects with three-dimensional ray-tracing codes as a function of angle of incidence and field of view. Through this analysis I learned that due to the incident converging F/13 beam on the calibration retarders, the previously assumed linear retarder model fails to account for effects above the project polarization specifications. I discuss modeling strategies such as Mueller matrix decompositions and simplifications of those strategies while still meeting fit error requirements. Finally, I present characterization techniques and how these were applied to prototype components.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Chipman, Russell A.
Commitee: Elmore, David F., Tyo, J. Scott
School: The University of Arizona
Department: Optical Sciences
School Location: United States -- Arizona
Source: DAI-B 77/10(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Astronomy, Optics
Keywords: Birefringence, DKIST, Daniel K. Inouye Solar Telescope, Polarimetry, Polarization, Retarder, Solar polarimetry
Publication Number: 10116376
ISBN: 9781339778303
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