Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Temporal analysis and spatial modeling of the distribution and abundance of <i>Cs. melanura</i>, Eastern Equine Encephalitis vector: Connecticut, 1997-2012
by White, Chelsi, M.S., The University of Arizona, 2016, 48; 10112058
Abstract (Summary)

Eastern Equine Encephalitis virus is a vector-borne virus amplified by the Culiseta melanura mosquito in an enzootic avian cycle, causing high morbidity and mortality to horses and humans when contracted as incidental hosts. The virus is distributed across most of the eastern United States, Canada, and Gulf coast, and has been expanding in geographic range and season of activity over time. Spatial-temporal trends in Cs. melanura abundance were correlated with available meteorological (temperature and precipitation) and remotely sensed environmental data for the period of 1997-2012 in Connecticut. The effects of inter-annual changes in precipitation, temperature, and groundwater levels on Cs. melanura abundances using time-series linear regression and cross-correlation analyses were inconclusive. Habitat modeling using logistic regression and landscape-based predictive variables demonstrated strong efficiency (46.2%) and acceptable sensitivity and specificity (65.6 and 78.6%, respectively) using NDVI difference and distance from palustrine areas as predictive factors. Remotely sensed data can improve the understanding of vector abundance patterns, helping to forecast future outbreaks and regional expansions by guiding surveillance efforts.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Brown, Heidi
Commitee: Ernst, Kacey, Garfin, Gregg
School: The University of Arizona
Department: Epidemiology
School Location: United States -- Arizona
Source: MAI 55/04M(E), Masters Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Entomology, Geographic information science, Epidemiology
Keywords: Connecticut, Culiseta melanura, Eastern Equine Encephalitis, Spatial modeling, Temporal analysis, Vector-borne disease
Publication Number: 10112058
ISBN: 9781339752310
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