Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Effectiveness of a Medication Reminder Device in the form of a Mobile Application to Improve Medication Adherence for Patients with Hypertension
by Leverette, Monica L., D.N.P., Brandman University, 2016, 87; 10103308
Abstract (Summary)

Nonadherence to antihypertensive medications is a widespread problem among dialysis patients. Nonadherence to antihypertensive medications can result in the dialysis patients’ morbidity and mortality. A pilot study was used to determine whether a medication reminder mobile application would improve dialysis participants’ adherence to their prescribed antihypertensive medications from a Midwest outpatient dialysis clinic. Dialysis participants prescribed one or more antihypertensive medications were invited to participate in the pilot study using Dosecast®, a mobile medication reminder application. The dialysis participants completed four self-reported questionnaires: Demographic Questionnaire, Brief Medication Questionnaire (BMQ-1), Modified Patient Satisfaction with Nursing Care Quality Questionnaire (PSNCQQ), and Morisky Medication Adherence Questionnaire (MMAS-8). The questionnaires were analyzed with descriptive statistics and an independent t-test. The results from the 20 dialysis participants showed that the participants’ improved their adherence with the antihypertensive medications. This showed that Dosecast® is a beneficial tool to increase dialysis participants’ adherence to antihypertensive medications.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Stoodley, Lynda
Commitee: Hanisch, Tyke, Schine, Patric
School: Brandman University
Department: Nursing and Health Professions
School Location: United States -- California
Source: DAI-B 77/09(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Nursing
Keywords: Adherence, Hypertension, Medication, Mobile, Patients, Reminder
Publication Number: 10103308
ISBN: 9781339668918
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