Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

One-to-one mobile technology and standardized testing: A quantitative ex post facto study
by Bayyan, Aquil F., Sr., EDD/ET, University of Phoenix, 2016, 131; 10100962
Abstract (Summary)

This quantitative, ex post facto study examined the impact a districtwide high school one-to-one mobile technology initiative had on the number of 10 th grade students in the Forney Independent School District (ISD) (Texas) who passed their standardized TAKS tests during the 2010 academic year. The research study used annual public Forney ISD (Texas) data obtained from the Texas Education Agency (TEA) website. The study compared the 2009 academic year when 10th grade students (n=520) did not have one-to-one mobile technology and the 2010 academic year when 10 th grade students (n=530) were able to use one-to-one mobile technology as their personal school and home device. Findings from the study determined if there was a statistically significant relationship between one-to-one mobile technology and the number of 10th grade students who passed their standardized TAKS tests during the 2010 academic year. With a chi-square critical value of 3.84 the results of the study showed a statistically significant relationship between the number of 10th grade students who passed their TAKS tests in 2010 with one-to-one mobile technology. In 2010, the number of 10th grade students who passed the English Language Arts test increased by 5% (92% to 97%) with a chi-square statistic of 12.86. The number of students who passed the Math test increased by 18% (65% to 83%) with a chi-square statistic of 44.39. The number of students who passed the Science test increased by 12% (70% to 82%) with a chi-square statistic of 21.04. The number of students who passed the Social Studies test increased by 6% (90% to 96%) with a chi-square statistic of 14.79. The number of 10 th grade students who passed all of their TAKS tests increased by 18% (57% to 75%) with a chi-square statistic of 38.67. The theoretical framework was constructed by the dual coding theory of Alan Pavio and the multiple intelligence theory of Howard Gardner.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Chen, Irene L.
Commitee: Langley, Seth R., Tutty, Jeremy
School: University of Phoenix
Department: School of Advanced Studies
School Location: United States -- Arizona
Source: DAI-A 77/09(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Educational tests & measurements, Education, Educational technology
Keywords: Digital divide, Educational leadership, Educational technology, Ex post facto, Quantitative, Standardized testing
Publication Number: 10100962
ISBN: 9781339648156
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