Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

The influence of maternal psychological control on mental health in youth and emerging adult children
by Goger, Pauline, M.A., California State University, Long Beach, 2016, 71; 10099866
Abstract (Summary)

Anxiety is debilitating, impairing, and highly prevalent across the lifespan. Parenting behaviors (e.g., high psychological control) have been implicated in increased risk for child and adolescent anxiety, but these associations have not been studied in emerging adults (ages 18-25) or using a developmental psychopathology approach that considers how the relationship between parenting behavior and youth mental health may vary across youth development. Accordingly, the current study examined whether maternal psychological control is significantly associated with anxiety symptoms in emerging adults, and whether the magnitude of this association varies among emerging adults and youth. Participants (n = 70 emerging adults, n = 43 youth) completed questionnaires about parenting behavior and anxiety symptoms. Regression analyses revealed that emerging adults whose mothers were higher in psychological control experienced higher anxiety than emerging adults whose mothers were lower in psychological control. The opposite association was observed in youth. Findings have implications for family-focused interventions.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Gonzalez, Araceli
Commitee: Correa-Chavez, Maricela, Thoman, Dustin
School: California State University, Long Beach
Department: Psychology
School Location: United States -- California
Source: MAI 55/04M(E), Masters Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Developmental psychology, Clinical psychology
Keywords: Anxiety, Developmental psychopathology, Emerging adults, Psychological control, Youth
Publication Number: 10099866
ISBN: 9781339638225
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