Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Differential dynamics of network states: implications for task switching
by Perkins, Matthew, Ph.D., Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, 2014, 112; 10099545
Abstract (Summary)

A change in a stimulus response relationship implies that there has been a change in the internal state of the relevant behavior-generating network. Frequently, network states are persistent, biasing responses for some time following stimulus exposure. This benefits subsequent behavioral performance when the same stimulus is re-encountered. Alternatively, it can also negatively impact initiation of a second (distinct) task, i.e. there can be a task-switch cost. Recently, work from a few invertebrate model systems has begun to determine how experience dependent network states are mediated on a cellular/molecular level. A fundamental question I have addressed is, does the establishment of one network-state remove a prior state, or can two network states overlap and interact? In this thesis I provide data that indicate that in the feeding circuit of Aplysia, network states that promote incompatible behaviors can indeed overlap. In addition, I describe a novel role for a cyclic nucleotide gated ion-current, as supporting an experience dependent network state through a persistent modulation of cell excitability.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Weiss, Klaudiusz R., Cropper, Elizabeth C.
Commitee: Baxter, Mark, Brezina, Vladimir, Proekt, Alex, Salton, Steve
School: Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai
Department: Neurosciences
School Location: United States -- New York
Source: DAI-B 77/09(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Biology, Neurosciences
Keywords: Central pattern generators, Implicit memory, Network states, Neuromodulation
Publication Number: 10099545
ISBN: 9781339635538
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