Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Shin-issei: An exploratory study of adjustment and coping of first generation Japanese immigrant women who immigrated as adults
by Nishimura, Haruyo, M.S.W., California State University, Long Beach, 2016, 97; 10065196
Abstract (Summary)

The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore acculturation, adjustment, and coping mechanisms of first generation Japanese immigrant women. Semi-structured, open-ended interviews were used with a sample of 13 Shin-Issei women. Shin-Issei women had strong ethnic identity and pride and continued to practice cultural traditions and customs while they incorporated U.S. culture into their daily living. Although Shin-Issei women experienced few incidents of prejudices or discriminations, they reported issues in conversational communication due to language barriers.

Shin-Issei women relied on other Shin-Issei women in the community as their support system. They were grateful for the support available within the Shin-Issei network, as well as for the community that embraced diversity, and several expressed desire to contribute as a community member. The results suggested that social workers should be sensitive to the unique needs of Shin-Issei women, who may be reluctant to seek services due to linguistic and cultural factors.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Potts, Marilyn
Commitee: Lam, Brian, Wilson, Steve
School: California State University, Long Beach
Department: Social Work
School Location: United States -- California
Source: MAI 55/04M(E), Masters Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Asian American Studies, Social work, Womens studies
Keywords: Acculturation, First generation immigrants, Japanese women, Japanses immigrant women
Publication Number: 10065196
ISBN: 9781339578385
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