Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Criterion validity of common career interest inventories: Relative efficacy with high school seniors
by Martin, Summer M.G., Ph.D., University of North Texas, 2015, 167; 10034344
Abstract (Summary)

Professional school counselors frequently use career interest inventories as part of a comprehensive guidance program to help students create a post-secondary school plan. The present study evaluates the validity of three commonly used interest inventories, the Myers- Briggs Type Indicator, Self-Directed Search, and Strong Interest Inventory on field of study choice for graduating high school seniors (N = 616) from a large, suburban high school in Texas. Students identified their intended postsecondary field of study category, were randomly assigned using stratification to three groups, and each group completed a different inventory. Group membership was evaluated to establish covariate balance on a wide variety of indicators. Data from each group was evaluated to determine the extent to which the inventory predicted the chosen field of study, as well as Other and Undeclared categories using logistic regression models. None of the inventory models suggest that the inventory accurately predicts Other or Undeclared outcomes. For students selecting intended postsecondary fields of study, the Self Directed Search predicts such outcomes better than other measures. Professional school and career counselors should consider the SDS in addition to narrative counseling strategies to add greater precision with career decision making among clients and students.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Hull, Darrell M.
Commitee:
School: University of North Texas
Department: Psychology
School Location: United States -- Texas
Source: DAI-A 77/08(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: School counseling, Educational psychology, Vocational education
Keywords: High school seniors, Interest inventories, Logistic regression
Publication Number: 10034344
ISBN: 978-1-339-53640-8
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