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Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Sexual identity development: Findings from an exploratory grounded theory study
by Kinsey, Lee, Ph.D., University of North Texas, 2015, 251; 10034324
Abstract (Summary)

Counselors and other mental health professionals lack training on healthy sexuality and sexual identity development (SID). To begin to construct a comprehensive model of SID that can be used in counseling and counselor education, I conducted an exploratory study utilizing a grounded theory approach to collect and analyze SID stories from a purposive sample of eight adults from the Dallas-Fort Worth, Texas area: four male and four female; seven White Caucasian-American and one Asian American; and self-identified as two gay, one lesbian, three heterosexual, and two sexually fluid. Participants elucidated a process model of the sexual-self that incorporated biological, psychological, social, cultural, and spiritual factors. Emergent themes included discovering, distinguishing, placing boundaries around, differentiating, and integrating the sexual-self. This preliminary model advanced a more holistic understanding of SID that counselors and other mental health professionals, educators, and researchers may find useful within their respective disciplines.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Holden, Janice Miner
Commitee:
School: University of North Texas
Department: Counseling and Higher Education
School Location: United States -- Texas
Source: DAI-B 77/08(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Counseling Psychology
Keywords: Counseling, Grounded theory, Human development, LGBT, Sex therapy, Sexual identity
Publication Number: 10034324
ISBN: 978-1-339-53620-0
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