Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Patients' lived experience of caring during hospitalization: A phenomenologic study
by Goodman, Marilyn Ellen, Ph.D., University of Phoenix, 2015, 138; 10029780
Abstract (Summary)

Caring is a complex phenomenon that has been described and linked to several other concepts such as competence, compassion, presence, intention, interconnectedness, detachment, coping, trust, reassurance, empathy, and advocacy. The significance of exploring the patients’ lived experience of caring can provide a framework for achieving the benchmarks evaluated during a hospitalization by the Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS). The higher the scores on the patients surveys provide better the feedback on the HCAHPS, which in turns increases the funding received from Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS). The HCAHPS are one measure used to calculate incentive payments with the Value-Based Purchasing program being the other measure. This hermeneutic phenomenological study was to explore the patients’ lived experience of caring during a minimum of a two night stay in the hospital. Watson’s caring theory was the guiding framework of this study to illuminate caring, and building relationships between the nurse and the patient. Fifteen adult patients over eighteen years of age who were hospitalized for a minimum of a two-night stay were interviewed in their private occupancy room. Following the data analysis using Van Kaam’s methods and NVivo software, two themes emerged: (1) being helped by someone who demonstrates presence and (2) being helped by someone with competence. Based on data analysis, patients expect their caregivers to demonstrate presence; this involves being available to meet their needs and providing care with competence knowing how to perform the skills and performing with proficiency.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Brett, Anne
Commitee:
School: University of Phoenix
School Location: United States -- Arizona
Source: DAI-B 77/07(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Health sciences, Nursing, Health care management
Keywords:
Publication Number: 10029780
ISBN: 9781339530772
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