Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Resilience in the Karen-Refugee Population from Myanmar/Burma Resettled in the U.S.: An Exploratory Study
by Lopez, Dixelia, Ph.D., The Chicago School of Professional Psychology, 2016, 130; 10007424
Abstract (Summary)

An exploratory, action research approach was used with adult Karen-Refugees (n = 26) separated by sex (male/female) in focus group sessions. The aim of the study was to explore a cultural-, context-specific definition of resilience and the factors that may contribute to resilience in resettlement using an ecological framework. In vivo coding techniques were used resulting in several themes. Results suggested a definition of resilience that encompassed a sense of gratitude, positive outlook, and resourcefulness; demonstrating a strong work ethic and perseverance, and moving towards a sense of community and belonging. Factors contributing to resilience in resettlement include language and availability of resources, the importance and value of education, the availability of other resources in the community (e.g., employment), a supportive civil society, special care for the elderly, and opportunities for the exhibition of cultural- pride, and preservation, which lead to a sense of community and belonging. Implications for prevention and intervention services are discussed along with contributions to literature pertaining to international psychology, resilience, and refugee research.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Giddie, Lord
Commitee: Poll-Hunter, Norma I., Sezibera, Vincent
School: The Chicago School of Professional Psychology
Department: International Psychology: Trauma Services Concentration
School Location: United States -- Illinois
Source: DAI-A 77/06(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Cultural anthropology, Social research, Psychology
Keywords: Community resilience, Indigenous psychology, Refugee, Resettlement, Resilience, Social support networks, United States
Publication Number: 10007424
ISBN: 9781339447841
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