Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

The Impact of Perceived Entitlement to Pain Support on Perceptions of Punishing Pain-Related Support: Are There Differences Between Cohabitating Couples and Parent/Adult Child Dyads?
by Thompson, April Harriett, Ph.D., Northcentral University, 2016, 141; 10003786
Abstract (Summary)

The Communal Coping Model of Pain Catastrophizing (CCMPC) postulates that pain catastrophizing occurs within social contexts as a way to communicate the need for support or empathy from others. An implied assumption of the CCMPC is that those individuals who catastrophize also feel entitled to pain-related support. To date, the majority of studies evaluating the CCMPC have focused on understanding the impact of pain catastrophizing on spousal support. The specific problem is that pain support provider characteristics may influence support provision, but there is no solid scientific evidence that the relationship of the person with pain to the pain support provider may be just as important given individuals elicit responses from close others, differently. This study is a quantitative quasi-experimental study to assess and compare the relationship between perceived entitlement to pain support and punishing pain-related perceived support among cohabitating couples and cohabitating parent/adult children dyads. Cohabitating couples were evaluated to validate a previously conducted seminal work among couples and cohabitating parent/adult child dyads were evaluated and compared to cohabitating couples as an original contribution. The participants in this study included a convenience sample of 200 subjects seeking treatment at a pain clinic in Chapel Hill, North Carolina. Multiple regression analyses was used to evaluate the relationship between the data collected from the solicitude subscale of the Survey of Pain Attitudes (SOPA) and the punishing response subscale of the West Haven-Yale Multidimensional Pain Inventory (MPI). A t-test and ANCOVA were also used to compare couples and parent/adult child dyads. The relationship between perceived entitlement to pain support and the perception of punishing pain-related support was significant, F (1, 133) =35.52, p = .00 among couples and among subjects living with a parent, F (1, 55) = 48.67, p = .00. The difference between the living situation groups on perceived entitlement to pain support and on perception of punishing pain-related support was not significant, t (193) = - 1.20, p = .23 and t (195) = - .76, p = .45, respectively. There was also no significant difference between the living situation groups in the relationship between perceived entitlement to pain support and punishing pain-related perceived support, F (1, 189) = .021, p = .89. Recommendations for future research include, the use of a more heterogeneous population to conduct observational studies, to conduct further research among parent/child dyads and among other dyads, as well as to conduct studies that work to better understand the interpersonal dimensions of pain.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Halkias, Daphne
Commitee: Avena, Nicola, Egbert, Robert
School: Northcentral University
Department: Psychology
School Location: United States -- Arizona
Source: DAI-B 77/06(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Psychology
Keywords: Chronic headache, Communal coping model of pain catastrophizing, Pain catastrophizing, Pain-related support, Perceived entitlement, Punishing support
Publication Number: 10003786
ISBN: 978-1-339-42894-9
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