Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Design and implementation of home automation control system based on Zigbee and transmission control protocol/internet protocol
by Cheng, Chih Wei, M.S., California State University, Long Beach, 2016, 43; 10001582
Abstract (Summary)

This project discusses the Home Automation System (HAS), which utilizes the technology of wireless sensor network (WSN). The control mechanism of these systems is based on ZigBee that works in collaboration with mobile and Internet systems. The input of these devices is quite different, which creates challenges for the creators of the system. Certain household devices are very easy to control while others have comparatively complex inputs. The system should be able to control both types of devices through a singular interface. This challenge is overcome by implementation of the wireless sensor nodes in a HAS. A highly important advantage of using ZigBee’s monitoring system is energy conservation, and reduction in power costs. Utilization of HAS leads to a decrease in consumption of water, electricity and other energy inputs, a reduction of the cost of utilities, and the improvement of security features. The paper demonstrates that Home Automation System has numerous applications beyond control of lighting, temperature and security cameras in a household. The technology opens up frontiers for numerous other applications in the area of home assistance and even in home health care.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Yeh, Hen-Geul
Commitee: Ary, James, Wang, Ray
School: California State University, Long Beach
Department: Electrical Engineering
School Location: United States -- California
Source: MAI 55/03M(E), Masters Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Communication, Electrical engineering
Keywords: Cc2530zdk, Home automation system, Monitoring system, Wireless sensor networks, Zigbee
Publication Number: 10001582
ISBN: 978-1-339-41514-7
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