Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Performance and analysis of different equalization schemes used in communications
by Arunachalam, Balakumar, M.S., California State University, Long Beach, 2016, 46; 1606704
Abstract (Summary)

Wireless communication is essential in today’s communication industry. Day by day its growth improves to meet people’s needs, and it plays an important role globally in both research and development. Communication can be separated into two types: wired and wireless. The most challenging of these two types is wireless communication because of physical obstacles like buildings, trees and the relative motions. The barriers between the main two components of wireless communication, the transmitter and the receiver, introduce fading. Fading is the weakening of the signals transmitted between the transmitter and the receiver and occurs due to the fluctuation in amplitude and phase over large distances. In addition to fading, external or thermal noise, BER (Bit Error Rate) and QOS (Quality of Service) might also cause more detrimental issues in wireless communication. In this experiment different channel models: Addictive White Gaussian Noise, Rayleigh, Rician, Nakagami and Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing (OFDM) are used to reduce fading of audio and video signals. The problems, such as fading and Inter Symbol Interference (ISI), were analyzed by using different channel models, evaluating fading environments, and by creating a simulation of Bit Error Rate (BER) curves that are plotted against different signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs). The OFDM was the most effective channel to eliminate these problems.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Kumar, Rajendra
Commitee: Ary, James, Wang, Ray
School: California State University, Long Beach
Department: Electrical Engineering
School Location: United States -- California
Source: MAI 55/03M(E), Masters Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Engineering
Keywords: Equalization schemes
Publication Number: 1606704
ISBN: 9781339397719
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