Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Effects of Simulation on Senior Nursing Students' Patient Safety Competence: A Quantitative Study
by Heatlie, Jeanne M., Ed.D., Northcentral University, 2015, 143; 3728985
Abstract (Summary)

The problem addressed in this study was the need for evidence-based teaching strategies that prepare nursing students to enter practice at graduation with the competencies to provide safe patient care. The purpose of the study was to investigate whether the addition of a patient safety focused human patient simulation (PS-HPS) learning activity during the final senior semester of a nursing program in southeast Michigan changes students’ perceptions of patient safety competence learning. For the pre-test post-test quasi-experimental study, a convenience sample of 48 undergraduate senior nursing students who engaged in the simulation was compared to 50 senior nursing students from the previous semester that did not receive the intervention. The Health Professional Education in Patient Safety Survey (H-PEPSS) was administered to both groups of nursing students during the second week of the final semester of a baccalaureate nursing program and again at the end of the semester. For the first research question, the ANCOVA test determined that there was no significant difference in post-test classroom learning scores between the comparison and treatment groups, controlling for pre-test classroom learning H-PEPSS scores, F (1, 95) = .000, p = .983, partial eta squared = .000. For the second research question, the ANCOVA test determined that there was no significant difference in post-test clinical learning H-PEPSS scores between the comparison and treatment groups, controlling for pre-test clinical learning scores, F (1, 95) = .496, p = .483, partial eta squared = .005. Implications for nursing education practice include: (a) simulation learning may not be more effective than traditional classroom learning strategies and (b) educators should continue to explore both classroom and clinical teaching strategies to advance students’ patient safety competence learning. One recommendation is to replicate the study with other nursing students from different locations. Secondly, the simulation scenario presented in this study could be modified by other instructors to effectively facilitate students’ patient safety learning. Additionally, a mixed methods research design may yield student responses that better reflects student learning within simulation. The proposed study adds to the nursing educational research about the effectiveness of simulation for students’ patient safety competence learning.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Brizek, Michael
Commitee:
School: Northcentral University
Department: School of Education
School Location: United States -- Arizona
Source: DAI-B 77/03(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Educational evaluation, Nursing, Health education
Keywords: Nursing education, Patient safety, Patient simulation
Publication Number: 3728985
ISBN: 9781339147277
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