Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Postcolonial approaches to the Hebrew Bible: Witchcraft accusations and gendered language in Ezekiel and other polemical prophetic texts
by Ortega, Christopher E., M.A., California State University, Long Beach, 2016, 157; 1603104
Abstract (Summary)

Postcolonial theory, while often reserved for analysis of modern political conditions, is often overlooked in biblical studies. The purpose of this thesis is to employ postcolonial analysis to the book of Ezekiel and demonstrate its value in biblical studies. Postcolonialism critiques national origin myths as political propaganda; seeks to retrieve the voices of those suppressed by hegemony; explores the power relations involved in ethnic and religious representation and authority; and examines how gender is used in hegemonic discourse. This study begins with an interrogation of the imperial politics behind several biblical national origin myths. A polyphony of contrapuntal voices are retrieved through archaeological, textual, and comparative evidence, demonstrating a plurality of Israelite religions for both the popular, illiterate, agrarian majority, as well as for officially state-sanctioned religions of the literate, urban, male elite. Finally, portions of the book of Ezekiel, a byproduct of imperialism itself, are analyzed for its use of gendered and sexualized language in continued polyphonic conflicts over religious representation and authority during a period of imperial crisis.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Stewart, David
Commitee: Pandya, Sophia, Stone, Jon R.
School: California State University, Long Beach
Department: Religious Studies
School Location: United States -- California
Source: MAI 55/02M(E), Masters Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Religion, Biblical studies, Judaic studies
Keywords: Ezekiel, Gender, Postcolonial, Rape, Sex, Witchcraft
Publication Number: 1603104
ISBN: 9781339205496
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