Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

An Examination of the Correlation between Teacher-Assigned Standards-Based Grades and Teacher-Assigned Traditional Grades and Student Achievement
by Tyree-Hamby, Ashley L., Ed.D., Lindenwood University, 2015, 125; 3732246
Abstract (Summary)

The relationship between teacher-assigned standards-based grades and teacher-assigned traditional grades and student achievement on the Missouri Assessment Program was examined for all students of the sample. The 120 participants for this study were third graders during the 2012-2013 school year transitioned to fourth grade during the 2013-2014 school year. The students were enrolled in Elementary School A in rural Missouri. One hundred twenty students’ permanent traditional and standards-based grade cards and Missouri Assessment Program (MAP) scores provided the data to determine the relationship between teacher assigned standards-based grade cards or teacher-assigned traditional grade cards and student achievement. The findings of this study provide strong suggestions for school districts considering a standards-based grading and reporting system in response to the recent transition away from traditional grading practices. The results of this study showed a significant relationship between teacher-assigned standards-based grades and student achievement on the MAP in the content areas of English Language Arts and Mathematics. The results of the study suggest standards-based grade reporting offers precise information concerning student learning that can be used as a measure of student achievement.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Williams, Julie
Commitee: DeVore, Sherry, Reid, Terry
School: Lindenwood University
Department: Education
School Location: United States -- Missouri
Source: DAI-A 77/03(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Educational tests & measurements, Elementary education
Keywords: Missouri assesment pogram, Student achivement
Publication Number: 3732246
ISBN: 978-1-339-19048-8
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